Broad Oak: your emotional support animal

Sunday, March 16, 2014

The better part of valour is indiscretion


Many lessons are too late for the learning.

Only now do we know what an alley-cat Roy Jenkins was, and of his (surmised, but also in those days hardly exceptional) erotic relationship at Oxford with future Cabinet Minister Tony Crosland, surely relevant to the former's campaign to decriminalise homosexuality. Should we have known this in 1967? Perhaps it wasn't essential.

But how long ago did it become public knowledge that Crosland, once his party was in power, had said, "If it's the last thing I do, I'm going to destroy every f***ing grammar school in England"? Should we have been told that at the time? Surely.

Now, we can peruse 40+-year-old ministerial briefings that show how Heath and others (including Macmillan - we do we leave him out of it?) plotted to make us part of a European political union without our realising it; but 70+ years on, according to master blogger John Ward, we still can't read the minutes of three British Cabinet meetings from May 1940.

It seems that on every matter of importance, we are kept in the dark at the vital moment. Yet some know the truth, and others know who knows.

To what extent do the mainstream media collude in suppressing information that must be revealed if we are to make informed decisions, or accept decisions made for us?


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2 comments:

A K Haart said...

I'm sure the mainstream media do collude in suppressing information. The upside for the rest of us is that we know they do it and assume the worst.

Sackerson said...

Good point.