Friday, February 18, 2011

People are a problem

The traditional European education systems are brutally exclusive. Students (except children of the rich) are not allowed to progress unless they can perform at the necessary level.

This puts pressure on students.

The US education system (and the English one for the past 30 years) is inclusive. Very little expense or effort is spared to have every student reach their 'full potential'.

This puts pressure on the teachers and the rest of the system.

The US and English systems should be producing a better 'yield' of the STEM (Science, technology, engineering and mathematics) people that we need, yet they are not.

A possible reason is above.

4 comments:

Sackerson said...

Succinct.

david said...

It is difficult to agree with the statement that the European system "puts pressure on teachers and the system." The pressure is, in my view, on parents. This is what the rage on "Tiger Mom" is about.

James Higham said...

The US and English systems should be producing a better 'yield' of the STEM (Science, technology, engineering and mathematics) people that we need, yet they are not.

There was an attempt by our national curriculum, circa 1992, to produce STEM outcomes and it was weighted towards science. In fact, if you were a science or maths teacher, you walked into a job.

However, they had to backtrack around 1994 and reorient towards the humanities. A lot of that had to do with soft option/hard option.

Paddington said...

@James - in the course of which, they completely messed up mathematics education, just as had been done in the US.

@David - the English and US systems do that. The European (and English system in which I was educated) put pressure on the students.